SIEMENS DX CONTINUES LAYOFF SCHEDULE

Siemens DX is far from ending its employee layoff schedule and it's rumored most sites will once again be hit before end of 2012.
USA-Sacramento was just hit and we in the UK were told pending layoffs will start here by next week.
The madness continues.

There is a plant in Wales,

There is a plant in Wales, after 9/11 it was expanded because not being able to get stuff out of the States whilst all the flights were locked down meant all the rest of the world couldn't get supplies either.

Siemens capitalised on this bigger capability and started running down LA which used to produce 60% of product to virtually nothing now.

Wales produces 99% of product for the worldwide market (DPC was active in great many countries, using partners and agents if necessary)

They produce 1000,000 tests a DAY!!!

Despite Bayers wettest dreams, not quite dead yet eh?

How much did DPC sell

How much did DPC sell for?
Considering how little of the company is left it must be a huge financial loss for Siemens.
I know they have a manufacturing facility in Wales and just curious if they do any Centaur/Vista work there also.

That's "Big BANG Theory", not

That's "Big BANG Theory", not "Band". And yes, Dade had gone public LONG before Siemens bought the firm. Bain was in no way involved in the $7B buy-out, contrary to what the numbnuts at Forbes may be spewing from their pieholes.

Dade went public three years

Dade went public three years before the siemens purchase.

Sheldon Cooper is the largest geek on 'big band theory'

I was under the impression

I was under the impression that Bain sold Dade-Behring to Siemens. Just a brief internet search seems to confirm that. For instance: "The company was bought for some $442 million in 1994 and ultimately sold in 2007 to Siemens [SI] for around $7 billion, a sixteen-times gain." from http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2011/11/14/was-romneys-turnarou.... There was an issue of control after the bankruptcy, but I still suspect that Bain was happy to get out however they could, knowing what the future really was despite all of the internal optimism and hoopla at Dade itself. You can accuse Bain of all sorts of things and either like or dislike their business and its operations, but I've yet to hear anyone call these guys stupid. But whatever the case, whether Bain was involved at the end, someone was smart enough to get out when the getting was good. The same was true for Bayer who had been shopping DX for years and for DPC. It's just how businesses operate these days.

PS: I am not Sheldon Cooper whoever he is and whatever he does. And your next guess is?

You are correct in much of

You are correct in much of what you say, except bain bailed out long before siemens arrived.

same old blah blah from

same old blah blah from Sheldon Cooper

Those with intimate knowledge

Those with intimate knowledge are long gone from each of Siemens' acquisitions. People focus on why Siemens bought each of the three parts and not on why they were sold? Why would Bayer sell DX if it were about to release a truly innovative, integrated chemistry-immunochemistry system? They knew Advia IMS would never fly and they'd just be left with Centaur which didn't fit in with their concept of filling all clinical laboratory needs. You can say the same about Dade and Vista. Say what you will about Bain, but they were quite a shrewd outfit. They knew when to buy and when to sell as well. DPC was facing an expensive upgrade to their technology (getting rid of the beads) and to find a way to expand their market into more developed countries, and MZ really wasn't into the business like his parents were. All three companies were facing problems. Many of the best had either left, retired, or were laid off to make the books look better before the sale.

And in came Siemens like a bouncy eager puppy dog. They knew nothing at all about diagnostics and its unique characteristics. But they had a plan and were enthusiastic about implementing it, not realizing or caring that the plan has some significant conflicts with reality. They didn't understand the degree of specialization, whether in R&D, sales, marketing, and service in which each company knew and understood their technology and what they were selling and servicing. Cross-training was superficial and ineffective. Some layoffs were part of the original plan, but many of them are a result of Siemens' managements' lack of understanding of the business, combined with arrogance and failure to create a real common culture and spirit of cooperativity among the three companies. They assumed it would just happen because this kind of teamwork is more part of the German culture than it is in the US. They just haven't gotten any of this since day one and show no sign of even trying to learn.

Can't you just see the smiles on the faces of those who sold the three pieces, knowing full well that just the sale alone would result in many, many layoffs.

you are all a bunch of

you are all a bunch of whining,losers

Laying off full time

Laying off full time employees with intimate knowledge of diagnostics equipment might be the right thing to do short term if sales slow down to the point customers want no new instruments. the long term problem appears when customer demand ramps up faster than manpower with the brain power. Bringing in contractors won't help because company policy is to limit their tour of duty to no more than 18 months, which is too short for the multi year design cycle.

DX will be fine - all the

DX will be fine - all the talent's leaving anyway and will not be replaced as they'll count as a cost saving/headcount reduction.

Management likes this as it means they escape having to make another questionable decision, so they covertly encourage it by pretending everything's fine whilst waiting for their payout and preaching what they last heard from up top.

Besides everything - as long as you can stomach saying YES to your superiors 24/7 and finding something else to blame your failures on you'll be set.

My mistake. It was two

My mistake.
It was two weeks/yr.
After over twenty years of very successful sales,
a new manager that was a richard cranium, but it is all
in my past with a new job, with a much better organization.
Good luck to you.
Stay until they give you the package.

are you his puppet

are you his puppet

yes 2 weeks per year, max 6

yes 2 weeks per year, max 6 months, has not changed

In the very recent past

In the very recent past (November) they gave 1 week for each year of service with a max of 6 months. They also paid for healthcare during that period.

There are various state

There are various state requirements that Siemens must follow. These probably vary a bit from state to state and you can certainly follow up on that independent of Siemens. Over the past several years, companies, including Siemens have offered severance pay amounting to anywhere between 1 and 2 weeks per year of service. This extended severance may, or may not, be mandated by individual states and you can check on that for your state. In some cases, for instance, Bayer diagnostics, those who volunteer for retirement/layoff might get a bonus (in the Bayer case, volunteers for one of their many layoffs received an extra 25% above what was then the Bayer standard of 2 weeks per year of service.

What will Siemens do? Your guess is as good as anyone else's here. Alot will depend on how generous Siemens feels like being and, perhaps, how well they really did in the 3rd quarter and what things look like for the 4th quarter.

Wish I could help more, but that's about it. Good luck whatever happens.

Could anyone elaborate on the

Could anyone elaborate on the current Siemens DX package for employee's on a layoff?

According to a post on

According to a post on another Siemens thread, 26 will be losing their jobs at Siemens Molecular in September. So layoffs are still coming and the only solace you can find in this news is that the chance of being laid off has just decreased a bit for those who remain. I suspect there will be additional layoffs, if not complete closure of LA and possibly this year, or early next. They keep claiming to be absolutely essential to Siemens, but Siemens does not have infinite patience either. Will be interesting to see how that inevitable situation actually plays out in terms of a timeline. If I had to guess, Siemens will also start to lay off all non-essential R&D people, that being those not working on the new system or providing critical assistance to existing products. Some product lines that are not profitable or profitable enough may get eliminated as well. One sort of wonders, for instance, what will Siemens do in hematology? They still show the Tarrytown hematolgy systems on their website, but it appears that this is close to zero effort to upgrade these systems or develop newer, more cost effective systems (Tarrytown hematology systems always suffered from being the high cost product on the market. Despite years of claiming superior technology compared to Coulter, these systems never gained more than 15-20 market share worldwide, primarily due to their high cost).

As I said earlier, the result is pretty much known; the devil is in the details.

Okay, thanks for the update.

Okay, thanks for the update. Not exactly the good news I was hoping to hear.
Still better to be prepared than having something sneak up on you. To be honest, I really don't understand the dX management and why they let things get so out of hand. I thought things were getting better, at least at my site.
I didn't get a chance to attend the AACC in LA so was unable to see what the competition is throwing at us.
I still feel Centaur is a good instrument.
Well, lets move forward and hope for the best.

Yes. Mr announced large

Yes. Mr announced large layoffs for this year and only some of them have been carried out. Even with his positive message, since he said nothing about not needing further layoffs, you can assume the remainder of the plan will be carried out before the end of the fiscal year. I don't know the numbers off hand right now (number laid off vs. number planned), but perhaps others here can refresh our collective memories.

Whatever the case, you assume there will be further layoffs this year. Where and when is not yet known and tends to be a major theme of the many Siemens threads.

Haven't heard any news about

Haven't heard any news about layoffs at my site. A good sign for sure.
Last MR E-mail we received went on about how well DX did this past quarter. For now, I don't see any bad weather coming for DX sites.

Is there any other information out there?

"Siemens Diagnostics Division

"Siemens Diagnostics Division India - Back to ways of harrasment, discrimination etc., CEO of India has kept all ethics in his cupboard in lock and key and it seems he has a support of Senior Management. Old days of discrimination of Bayer staff has started. He has settled all Ex DB guys in lucrative positions in India and abroad. Does it means that these DB guys are extra ordinary talented? All types of finaincial irregularities are there in indian system like ordering of products, imports, licensing and above all they are using compliance as a grinding tool to supress the voices. The irony is that the Senior Management has inkling of this but god only knows why they are silent?"

How is this possible? Dan Sullivan would never let this happen.

"when MR announced cp he said

"when MR announced cp he said it would be over the next 2 years, so what do you idiots not understand?"

MR just talked about himself. Apparently you're not in the management level to understand this.

Siemens Diagnostics Division

Siemens Diagnostics Division India - Back to ways of harrasment, discrimination etc., CEO of India has kept all ethics in his cupboard in lock and key and it seems he has a support of Senior Management. Old days of discrimination of Bayer staff has started. He has settled all Ex DB guys in lucrative positions in India and abroad. Does it means that these DB guys are extra ordinary talented? All types of finaincial irregularities are there in indian system like ordering of products, imports, licensing and above all they are using compliance as a grinding tool to supress the voices. The irony is that the Senior Management has inkling of this but god only knows why they are silent?

when MR announced cp he said

when MR announced cp he said it would be over the next 2 years, so what do you idiots not understand?

"I'm betting LA will survive

"I'm betting LA will survive again this time, and there will be at least one other site shuts down before LA in 2013."

You may be right, but not closing LA this year or even next is more of a sign of Siemens' management incompetance than it is of LA's value at this point. The people who made DPC what it once was are long gone. What is left are the few leftovers who are still needed to feed reagent manufacturing, but who have no role in Siemens future plans and could, almost certainly, not sustain themselves as an independent company (meaning there is not enough value left for Siemens to even sell Immulite to someone else.

The dilemna for Siemens is when, not if, they will abandon Immulite. Since Siemens will have to give ample notice to current Immulite users of the system being discontinued (perhaps up to a year lead time), they will have to project forward to estimate when the cost of maintaining Immulite exceeds profits from the remaining systems in the field. It is hard to think of any other company to be so slow to get rid of that which they have indicated since day that they do not want for their long term future. The incompetance of Siemens senior management is staggering !

"I'm betting LA will survive

"I'm betting LA will survive again this time, and there will be at least one other site shuts down before LA in 2013."

You know what, I think your right! just been looking at some issues and the back order situation is getting out of control again, some kits out until at least September. They can't afford to kill any capacity yet, I would wager $100 of my beer money LA will be enjoying Christmas dinner in the canteen. I would bet $50 to make it 2013/14 as well!

I'm betting LA will survive

I'm betting LA will survive again this time, and there will be at least one other site shuts down before LA in 2013.

Now that we got through all

Now that we got through all that stuff can we get back to any layoff news.
Where? & When?
I'm betting the September-End of Year DX financials will be awful. Of course they'll put a spin on it but that only last for so long.
If another 600-800 will be let go I'm betting most, if not all, will be US based.

The actual M&A is one thing.

The actual M&A is one thing. The long line of stupid decisions, wrong personnel moves and lack of any management direction is where they've gone fatally wrong. The german way is not always the right way, especially in this business.

Agree and like your

Agree and like your analogies. But have a different opinion on the M&A, which I've been working on since I got my MBA ten years ago. Simply put, it's always the big boss call through his inner circle or networking about which company to acquire. We just applauded and presented the "good" numbers. The role M&A played is not different than other corporate functions, e.g. to serve the masters well, even if they're ridiculously wrong.

I don't think there's very

I don't think there's very much unique to the DPC story, it's happened 100's of times and will continue to happen. Basic outline is:
- small innovative entreupreneurial start-up creates a new market
- grows large enough to make it attractive for a large corporation to buy it
- cultural divide between companies too large and big company "swallows" the little one, heart and soul
- after 5 years or so, little is recognizable of what's left of small company
- large corporation rumbles on, devouring other successful smaller companies in its path

Gene Roddenbury of Star Trek fame captured this story the best with his "Borg" theme. All will be assimulated, and resistance is futile! If you want to avoid assimulation, lay low or stay out of the path of the "mothership"! In this case, though, it was a "Vatership".

Another good analogy is the "Matrix" movies. Either swallow the green pill and stay connected to the cozy life of the "mothership", or take the red pill and "wake up", and join the resistance (which as we learned above is futile!) :-)

I would suggest you all look within, figure out what makes you happy, and then "go for it"! DPC and all these similar stories have been analyzed enough - the pattern is clear. Learn from it, and move on. The exciting place to be in large corporations is in the finance and strategic mergers and acquisition groups: they are the ones who plot the course of the large corporation "mothership". All the rest are just Borg or connected to the matrix, carrying out the instructions from the "playbook".

Yes, you are correct. It is

Yes, you are correct. It is all very odd indeed. You are also correct that I never worked at DPC. I am puzzled over why you feel that I must have an axe to grind with respect to DPC. I think I have been fairly objective over the years when it comes to what I have posted about DPC; its positives and negatives, its highs and lows.

Perhaps my only 'crime' is having forecasted a future that was unbelievable to many at DPC and advised the people there to abandon ship as soon as possible. But the thought that LA was doomed was too traumatic for many to accept despite every early action that Siemens took toward that end. So pardon me for having provided some objectivity and foresight and advice. And pardon me for saying that DPC was an excellent company for what it was, but that it didn't have an exclusive on scientific talent in the industry.

By your own admission you

By your own admission you have been perusing, analyzing, disecting, prognosticating, giving career advice, etc. and for what purpose exactly? No axe to grind!!?? Sir you cannot see the forest through the trees............it is YOU that is obsessing inordinately.......have you no life other than to obsess about DPC, while claiming you do not work there?
This is all very odd.

Hey, Mr. Psych major: You say

Hey, Mr. Psych major:

You say DPC people have a good reason to be angry. But how long should the go on about it? What is that called? As for me, I have no axe to grind whatever. I merely look at data and try to analyze it without passion. My analysis years ago predicted exactly what would happen to DPC, albeit Siemens took much longer than could have reasonbly been expected. I never said Siemens was doing the right (or wrong) thing in taking the decision to close LA and eventually kill Immulite. I did this to try to let the people in LA know what was about to happen so that, hopefully, they could take appropriate actions to secure their own futures. At the time, I expressed my compassion for them. But its years later and I still see the postings of how great DPC was. I have always recognized what DPC accomplished under the Z's. They were good ... very good, but I've never been convinced that they walked on water. If that were true, I would have expected competitors to have gone after the best and brightest even in a bad economy and, to my knowledge, that never happened.

Just seems to me that after 5 years enough reminiscing, enough pride, and enough anger has been expressed here. Harping on the past is not healthy. What did your psych courses teach you about that?

I agree with the previous

I agree with the previous poster, this guy has been on here posting this stuff forever, and he complains about the DPC staff going on and on.......who is he kidding? The DPC guys have good reason to be angry, their good company and jobs were destroyed by the sale of the company. So what is this guys beef? He has an axe to grind for sure and his fixation on getting his view grafted to the frustrated ex-DPC'ers is puzzling to say the least.

I would say it borders on an OCD type mental illness. I come back periodically to psycho analize his postings.......very interesting for me, a former psych major.

for someone that doesn't care

for someone that doesn't care that much, you really, really go on!

It must be fun living in the

It must be fun living in the past and fondly remembering the old DPC, a company that no longer exists. While I can respect the original DPC when MZ and SZ were running things, I have problems understanding how such a smart group of people were completely resistant the the concept that Siemens long term plan was to shut DPC down, period. Post after post showd the denial that existed in LA at the time of the acquisition. You just thought you were too good to be put out of existence and as more and more evidence showed what Siemens plan really was, the DPC simply went into a shell and resisted the simple facts. I was never here to support what Siemens did but simply to recognize what their strategy was, good, bad, or indifferent. What happened at DPC reminds me of people who live in a valley and are told that there will be heavy rains and extreme flooding and who say: it can't happen here and wind up staying in place rather than taking some friendly advice. The fact that, to date, Siemens has totally screwed up their attempts to transfer assays to other systems, does not make the original DPC people any better than they ever were or give them any special bragging rights. It simply reflects on the naivete of Siemens management and the clumsy manner in which they tried to manage the changes. Many of us were sad to the demise of DPC, but were realistic enough to understand the financial reasons why Siemens chose to kill LA.

But all of that is ancient history now. What I can't understand is how the original DPC people can still be sitting around ... dazed and confused .. and still whining that their demise should have never happened. We get it that you WERE good. We don't get why you feel so insecure that you need to still be praising yourselves and that you can't seem to move on with your lives and put your glory days behind you ... times to be remembered at reunions and to comfort you in your old age. How easily you forget the tough times at DPC and the somewhat autocratic ways in which the Z's ran things. That's ok too, but trying to live in the past, year after year, just doesn't make sense. Remembering the past is alot different than trying to live in the past which some of you seem intent on doing. And for what it's worth, while many people respect the old DPC, we also recognize that DPC was never a worldwide leader or power; they had a very successful niche in the market, but never came close to being dominant. In reality, most of the people who worked at DPC competitors never really considered DPC to be a threat. Bayer/Technicon, Roche/Boehringer Mannheim, Abbott, Beckman, Dade/Dupont all worried about each other but generally paid little attention to the smaller players like DPC and all of the other small and mid-sized companies that were minor players in the market. Yes, DPC probably went farther than one could expect, but ultimately did not have the resources to compete with the big boys.

So do us all a favor and move on. We are tired of hearing about how good DPC was a decade or more ago. It is no longer relevant to any our lives or businesses and the same should be true for you. Just take a short walk over some water, turn some water into wine for us as you move on to new job interviews with companies that recognize your unique talents. If you were really all that good, you should have had few troubles in finding new and satisfactory employment, even in these bad times.

Virtually nothig and no one

Virtually nothig and no one currently at the old DPC facility, resembles anything like the company that Siemens bought. Anything you say about anyone there at this point is meaningless. This points to how little you people actually know about the original company and its uniqueness. Its like comparing Katie Curic to Walter Cronkite; same channel, same anchor position, but a wee bit of difference I'd say.

Siemens should retain DPC

Siemens should retain DPC talents Like A.G "director of systems engineering". This guy never studied .. DPC management is a big Joke

Just grow up some day eh?

Siemens should retain DPC

Siemens should retain DPC talents Like A.G "director of systems engineering". This guy never studied .. DPC management is a big Joke

"Immulite: Old system; old

"Immulite: Old system; old technology. Mostly used in smaller markets. Assays with relatively high quality that may exceed the needs of more developed markets. System ultimately doomed for extinction with the hopes of converting users to Centaur or whatever new system Siemens develops. Major difficulties seem to remain in terms of reagent supply. Verdict: Bite the bullet already and kill it."

Not quite dead actually... Llanberis currently ships --- ONE MILLION --- tests -- A DAY --- out! sure that size of customer base would be pretty upset if Siemens bit the bullet, certainly wouldn't rush to order Centaurs. The Immulite products are an order of magnitude more reliable and cheaper so the support costs are so much less. they make a lot more profit. Even Siemens management are not THAT suicidal!

"The point of buying three

"The point of buying three companies was to use DPC as a cash cow.............. Little did Siemens know how easy it would be to screw things up."

The only way DPC could have been a cash cow is if their uniquely wide ranging menu was loaded up on the other platforms, as Immulite was aging technology. I am sure this was the original conception, but the "cash cow" label doesn't make sense as of the time of the purchase. The label only makes sense AFTER the assays were on the other systems generating interest from those looking for newer technologies and a neatly consolodated wide ranging menu with a more modern platform than Immulite offered.

So how foolish was Siemens in assuming that they could lay off
80-90% of DPC's staff BEFORE their menu was actually loaded up on the other platforms? I would say pretty foolish indeed, but having to admit that it might have been wise to retain DPC's talent during the adaptive phase was probably more than the German arrogance could shoulder. Imagine that.......German arrogance and hubris concerning a divisions talent value, sinks the entire DX conception, simply because they had no idea of how complicated all of this stuff really was. Just line up the menu's of the three divisions and lets see how much of DPC's stuff is on the other platforms.............opps I almost forgot, some of the other platforms can't even get their own assay's from their own menus to perform consistantly. What a freeking can of worms...........

In response to a few recent

In response to a few recent posts:

The point of buying three companies was to use DPC as a cash cow and an entry point for converting Immulite customers to Centaur companies. Bayer was purchased for Centaur and their licenses in the hepatitis and HIV domain as well as the gamble that the Advia IMS could be a winner. DuPont was purchased for there large market share in clinical chemistry with the added benefits of the old Behring and Syva product lines. Vista, much like IMS was a gamble. When you look at it at the time when the acquisitions actually occurred, the plan actually made some sense. Little did Siemens know how easy it would be to screw things up.

Another post has talked about consolidation of products. That's been talked about at the Rumour Mill for years as well. But let's look at it from a practical point of view. What products are there for Siemens? Dimension, Advia Chemistry systems, Centaur, Immulite, Vista and a few other odds and ends including the old Bayer hematology business. Looking these product lines over there isn't really much overlap.

Dimension is old, almost ancient. But it works and is a reliable workhorse systems for many mid-sized labs. There are new, more 'advanced' systems out there, but they don't necessarily outperform Dimension. Verdict: Dimension is a keeper for now.

Advia chemistry systems: OEM systems with OEM reagents. Much less profitable as a result. Many assays are not state of the art, but since these systems are intended for higher throughput, larger labs, they meet the needs in many cases. Verdict: These systems are keepers simply to keep a foothold in the larger lab market.

Centaur: Each succeeding version of Centaur seems to decrease in quality. Broad menu including essential HIV and hepatitis. Major market is in developed countries. Verdict: Right now it's Siemens only real game in immunochemistry. It has to be a keeper.

Immulite: Old system; old technology. Mostly used in smaller markets. Assays with relatively high quality that may exceed the needs of more developed markets. System ultimately doomed for extinction with the hopes of converting users to Centaur or whatever new system Siemens develops. Major difficulties seem to remain in terms of reagent supply. Verdict: Bite the bullet already and kill it. Accept whatever losses you have for accounts you can't convert to Centaur. You also gain the end to the interminable saga of trying to shut down LA and probably can shut Llanberis down as well.

Vista: Hard to say on this one. Vista is still far from meeting its promise. It just doesn't seem to be catching on with customers. The decision to keep or abandon Vista is very dependent on what the new Siemens system will be, when it will be ready, and how confident Siemens is in its performance, reliability, cost to complete development, and it's ability to not just meet basic customer needs, but to really attract customers. If the new system can really come out in a couple of years and be successful, then kill Vista. If the reality is 4,5, 6 more years, then it might be worth it to hold on to Vista, try to patch it up until it works just in case the new system doesn't turn out to be what Siemens expects.

I am not sure what the most recent 'consolidator' had in mind, but the only thing I see that can be eliminated as a redundancy is Immulite and siemens is trying, still trying .. struggling ... desparately to end the nightmare. I am not sure what else can be consolidated (eliminated). Siemens appear to have taken the decision to develop the new system at multiple sites (another one of those 'if Siemens could make the worst decision possible, they would' decisions ... I mean, really, expecting multiple sites with multiple histories and culture to work together for the first time on a very challenging project? give me a break!!), so closing those sites seems out of the question right now. Are there really other sites or product lines that could reasonably be consolidated right now? I wonder if Siemens can really appreciate the hole they have created for themselves. It's a real nightmare, in reality, and the executives are running around spouting good-news syndrome ... worse yet, they actually believe their own propaganda.

Now we have consolidation

Now we have consolidation into the Xray/MRI side of the business, the thinking being that this model would somehow rub off on DX and make it magically more efficient and profitable with Siemens magic.
END QUOTE

That might be one theory.
Another one which continues making the rounds is DX was incorporated into Healthcare so that the financial loss would not be as apparent as it has, and continues, to be.
Xray/MRI and most of IMAGING are doing great.
It never occurred to Siemens that DX, financially, would do so badly so it was originally kept separate from Healthcare.
Well, a few quarters and major losses ago it was decided to "integrate" DX in Healthcare.
It's not magic. It's just bad business.

"I don't think Siemens will

"I don't think Siemens will take years to finish DX layoffs considering the millions already lost on a multi-year Integration which went nowhere.
I'm told in LA's case they already lost ~90% of there employee's since they were bought. So they weren't exactly spared.
Last years layoffs concentrated mainly on East Coast. I haven't a clue as to where they'll hit this time around.
Siemens DX only has two plans in motion.
Agenda 2013 and Consolidation.
Agenda 2013, for DX, is mainly lowering prices on old platforms in the hopes of retaining current customers. Not exactly the best of ideas since DX customers are continuing to leave for competitors such as Roche as well as smaller companies with newer and better instruments. This has been happening every quarter to date.
Consolidation is their only recall to cut financial loss. They still have a large amount of redundant sites which they haven't dealt with yet.
Yes, good quarters and bad quarters but the good ones had only marginal increases.
AACC this year was a total bust for Siemens DX. Apparently Healthcare's IMAGING is the only division keeping them afloat."

Spot on. I just don't understand where Siemens thought their new DX division was ever going to go?

What was the point of buying the 3 parts, sure you could in theory join them together and make some consolidation savings, but then what? Now we have consolidation into the Xray/MRI side of the business, the thinking being that this model would somehow rub off on DX and make it magically more efficient and profitable with Siemens magic. Well apart from both having products in hospitals they have nothing in common - its a monumentally naive fail as its about to screw up DX big time.

Its not much of a master plan is it? surely when someone at Siemens top level put their hand up and said 'hey lets go spend 8 billion and get us some DX' - someone said 'OK but then what do we do with it?'... APPARENTLY NOT! Surely that must be the scariest thing for Siemens, someone can decide to spend that much money on something they know nothing about and have no idea what to do to even sustain it, let alone grow it.

Think I might go out and get a job at LA, those magic techs seem to have formulated the elixir of eternal life LOL

What else can Siemens and MR

What else can Siemens and MR do? It is too late and too big to do much else.
END QUOTE

Actually, that's the easy part.
You eliminate platforms you don't want anymore due to cost, age and low return. You then concentrate on menu, sales and customers on those you keep.
Siemens DX has too many old generation instruments.
Staying #1 in size and sales is no longer a factor. Six years ago they were #1. Now they are #4 or lower in sales.
They are dying of a cancer they "can" cure themselves from.
The cure is consolidation and getting leaner.
Will they...seriously doubt it. It's not the way Germans handle business especially admitting huge costly mistakes were made.
DX is currently so far under the financial curve they expected 6 years ago I would think many current CEO's are planning exit strategies after Agenda 2013 fails to produce expected revenue.
Lucky for them other Divisions are done much better.
For now, lets see how many DX layoffs are planned.

What else can Siemens and MR

What else can Siemens and MR do? It is too late and too big to do much else.

I don't think Siemens will

I don't think Siemens will take years to finish DX layoffs considering the millions already lost on a multi-year Integration which went nowhere.
I'm told in LA's case they already lost ~90% of there employee's since they were bought. So they weren't exactly spared.
Last years layoffs concentrated mainly on East Coast. I haven't a clue as to where they'll hit this time around.
Siemens DX only has two plans in motion.
Agenda 2013 and Consolidation.
Agenda 2013, for DX, is mainly lowering prices on old platforms in the hopes of retaining current customers. Not exactly the best of ideas since DX customers are continuing to leave for competitors such as Roche as well as smaller companies with newer and better instruments. This has been happening every quarter to date.
Consolidation is their only recall to cut financial loss. They still have a large amount of redundant sites which they haven't dealt with yet.
Yes, good quarters and bad quarters but the good ones had only marginal increases.
AACC this year was a total bust for Siemens DX. Apparently Healthcare's IMAGING is the only division keeping them afloat.

Everybody just calm down. For

Everybody just calm down. For sure there will be layoffs, but it will take DX years to finish. Just look at LA. Unless they decided to close other great DX sites and spare LA for 2012.

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